Life after Meth IS possible

Living a prosperous and fruitful life is possible after addiction.

While quitting meth may be one of the hardest things an addict will ever do, it is possible. After an addict quits a meth habit it can be hard to find a sense of self. Often times meth addicts become so consumed with the lifestyle of using and seeking out drugs that a sober life can leave one wondering “what do I do with myself without meth”. This new life and new found clarity can sometimes leave ex-addicts feeling helpless and isolated.

It is critical to know that not only is your body many times capable of bouncing back, your mind is capable of amazing feats. You truly can move past the phase after addiction and live a rewarding life. One such example of this is DrPsych at the All About Addiction blog.

Postscript: (Link to blog removed because it appears the blog was replaced with another website). DrPsych’s blog was a fantastic blog and resource written by a man who was once a meth addict, turned sober psychologist.

DrPsych admittedly used meth through his earlier years in college in order to get through demanding classes and studying for exams. It didn’t take long for his infrequent use to become a daily habit that took 6 years to kick. Like many ex-addicts; after his addiction he had a choice to make: he could fade into obscurity or press on. Thankfully he chose the latter.

Today, DrPsych is working hard to earn a PhD in Psychology; specifically studying addiction. He also runs a successful blog that serves to teach others that life after meth is not only do-able, but is scientifically possible. He is living proof of that very fact. Taking the following from his “about” page shows that he is very open about his past addiction:

I’ve had my own experiences with drug abuse and addiction, and so don’t expect my writings to be devoid of personal input that I feel I can contribute given my experience. Also, I hope to serve as a source of inspiration for struggling addicts who aren’t certain that they can still make something of their lives after all the devastation. I’ve been on both sides and I can assure you that it’s possible!

His contribution to the world of understanding addiction is invaluable. How often do you see a doctor who has been through the same addictions as you (or is willing to admit it)? I highly recommed his blog if you are interested in learing about the mechanics of addiction from someone who has seen life as an addict first hand. One of my personal favorites is his series on addiction and the brain because I am fascinated at how the brain works; especially the effects of meth on your brain.